SUSTAINABLY CULTIVATED, EXTREMELY FRESH,
HEALTHY AND ACCESSIBLE TO MANY: CLARESSE.
THIS NEW FRESHWATER FISH, MEMBER OF THE
EUROPEAN CATFISH FAMILY, HAS A DELICIOUS MILD TASTE. IT IS TENDER, HAS A FIRM STRUCURE AND IS EASY TO PREPARE. CLARESSE, AVAILABLE IN EUROPE FROM NOW ON, IS A SPECIALTY IN ITSELF BUT IS ALSO AN EXCELLENT SUSTAINABLE REPLACEMENT FOR OVERFISHED WHITEFISH SORTS.

About Claresse

People around the world love to eat fish. Claresse offers a sustainable answer to the growing global demand. Claresse is a freshwater fish that originates from a natural crossing between two fish sorts from the European catfish family.

And so it is an excellent sustainable replacement for overfished whitefish sorts. Claresse is cultivated in the Netherlands. Anova, responsible for Claresse, is the last link in the chain of partners from the whole cultivated fish process that goes from the fish feed to the final fresh-food markets.

Because the newest techniques are used, Anova is able with Claresse to produce the most sustainable fish of the Netherlands.

Sustainability

The fish are cultivated in covered ponds with a worldwide unique recycling system, wasting very little water and energy, thereby taxing the environment is to a minimum. Furthermore, a lot of heed is paid to the welfare of the fish.

They swim in water of the highest quality, have enough food and are not restricted in their natural behaviour because of the animal friendly basins. They are therefore free of stress.

Food conversion is very low: even less than 1:1. There is no question of using hormones or GMO feed (feed that has been enriched by genetically modified organisms). The farms are family owned companies, who work closely together with specialists, thereby guaranteeing the best quality.

  1. unique recycling system with a minimal environmental impact
  2. a lot of care for the welfare of the fish
  3. no use of hormones or GMO feed
  4. 24-hours supervision by specialists
"Anova promotes Claresse® that is recommended as sustainable species by the WWF and SNF"